China's Forced Repatriation of North Korean Defectors

China's Forced Repatriation of North Korean Defectors

By: Abbie Carver.

The human rights concerns surrounding the DPRK are abundant. Tens of thousands of North Korean civilians have been abducted by the North Korean government; family members of “dissidents” have disappeared; North Koreans sent to prison camps experience torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment (many fall ill or die soon after entering custody); citizens must obtain permission to travel within the country as well as abroad; women are trafficked and forced into marriages; and millions of North Koreans face extreme hunger or starvation.

 

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How Latin and South America Protects Intellectual Property

How Latin and South America Protects Intellectual Property

By: Tyler Seling.

Protecting intellectual property (“IP”) is an important aspect of any business or organization. Whether utilizing trademarks for brand development, copyrights for the works of authorship, or patents for the design or innovation it’s created, having an established IP policy is critical to succeeding in the competitive digital market.

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The Fight for "Las 17"

The Fight for "Las 17"

By: Monica Macias.

El Salvador has some of the world's most draconian abortion laws. In 1998, abortion was outlawed in El Salvador. The crime carries a prison sentence of up to eight years, but when it is treated as homicide, women are sentenced up to four decades in jail.The tough on crime law enforcement approach has even spilled over to instances where an abortion is inferred cases where a miscarriage occurred. 

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Legal Ramifications of Norway’s Government-Abducted Children

Legal Ramifications of Norway’s Government-Abducted Children

By: Brad Bourne.

Simply put, Norway is generally considered to be one of the best countries to call “home.” Despite a well-founded reputation, Norway is not flawless or free of controversy. From 2008 to 2013, there was a fifty percent increase in the overall number of children removed from their homes in Norway. Together, these cases, and the public’s response to them, serve as the basis for the assertion that the Norwegian government is engaged in the practice of “child-kidnapping."

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Centuries After Vlad Dracula, Corruption Continues to Suck Romania Dry

Centuries After Vlad Dracula, Corruption Continues to Suck Romania Dry

By Calla Ketchens.

Corruption was so prevalent in Romania that when it joined the European Union in 2007, along with Bulgaria, the European Commission established the Cooperation and Verification Mechanism (CVM) specifically for these two countries in order to assess Romania’s progress in fighting corrupt practices. Romania has made progress in its fight against corruption, but, if the recent protests in Romania are any indication, Romania still has a long way to go before the CVM reaches its expiration date of 2019.

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The U.S. Should Follow Iceland’s Example: Iceland Throws The First Stone At The Glass Ceiling

The U.S. Should Follow Iceland’s Example: Iceland Throws The First Stone At  The Glass Ceiling

By: Hannah Bloom.

The glass ceiling. What is this mysterious yet familiar term? You may have heard of it before, but not known what it actually meant. The glass ceiling. What is this mysterious yet familiar term? Workplace pay is one area that the glass ceiling applies to and Iceland is attempting to tear it down.

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Paradiso and Campanelli v Italy: Surrogacy Agreements and their Exploitation of Surrogate Mothers and Children in the EU

Paradiso and Campanelli v Italy: Surrogacy Agreements and their Exploitation of Surrogate Mothers and Children in the EU

By: Kelly Kane.

A recent case before the European Court on Human Rights has raised the issue of surrogacy as a form of human trafficking.  While Article 8 prohibits “interference by a public authority with the exercise of” the right to private life and family life, in January the Court determined that removal of a six-month-old child from his adoptive parents was not a violation of this right.

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Did the Catholic Church Save the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or Will the Human Rights Violations Continue?

Did the Catholic Church Save the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or Will the Human Rights Violations Continue?

By: Steve Ragatzki.

According to the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the President shall be elected by a direct election from the people for a five-year term. The President may seek reelection only once. However, the President shall remain in office until the President-Elect “effectively assumes his functions.” Whatever the reason, Kabila has stayed in office well beyond the expiration of his term.          

 

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Catalan Independence and the Human Right of Self-Determination

Catalan Independence and the Human Right of Self-Determination

By: Mikka Burrell.

Catalonia is a part of Spain geographically larger than some EU countries. However, the 7.5 million inhabitants of Catalonia neither speak Spanish nor consider themselves Spaniards. Does international law provide a foundation for the ongoing claims for Catalonian independence?

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Climate Change as a Threat to Human Rights in the Maldives

Climate Change as a Threat to Human Rights in the Maldives

By: Courtney McCausland.

A number of island nations face the potential of losing land mass due to climate change. Some nations could become uninhabitable due to loss of farmable land and contamination of fresh water sources. The peoples of such nations face the possibility of statelessness. How can atoll nations prepare today for their citizens' future?

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Preserving the Ocean: Palau’s National Marine Sanctuary Act

Preserving the Ocean: Palau’s National Marine Sanctuary Act

By: Andrea Fogelsinger.

International and unilateral agreements to regulate global resources are often questionably effective in their ability to effect change. One Pacific nation has taken matters into its own hands in establishing marine sanctuaries and no take zones to protect its resources and prevent mass extinction. 

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Must a New Nation Return Property Seized by a Prior Regime?

Must a New Nation Return Property Seized by a Prior Regime?

By Savannah Priebe.

 

World War II wounds have once again resurfaced in the form of legal action, this time against the country of Croatia. Descendants of Croatian Serbs, Jews and Roma are now seeking repayment for their relatives' seized property and suffering during World War II. This post analyzes this current controversy under adhere to the intent of the UNIDROIT convention and Croatia's responsibility to repatriate any property now its its control from World War II.

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