France Passes Controversial Asylum Law

France Passes Controversial Asylum Law

France recently passed a controversial new asylum law that dramatically reduces the amount of time asylees have to file an application for relief and criminalizes illegally entering the country, which is punishable by up to one-year imprisonment. The law has received harsh criticism from both human rights groups and French National Assembly members themselves.

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Russia’s Decriminalization of Domestic Violence – Why Report if Nothing Happens?

Russia’s Decriminalization of Domestic Violence – Why Report if Nothing Happens?

In 2017 Russia removed criminal penalties from acts of domestic abuse that do not leave lasting physical injury. Russian law makers say that this is not a dismissal of the issue and that it still considers domestic violence to be an important societal problem. However, when reporting leads to nothing more than a fine, women have little incentive to make a formal report.

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Equality in the Form of Expropriation: South Africa’s Attempt to Equalize Farming Opportunities by Seizing Farms Owned by White Farmers

Equality in the Form of Expropriation: South Africa’s Attempt to Equalize Farming Opportunities by Seizing Farms Owned by White Farmers

This article looks at the South African Constitution and the purposes behind the new South African land reform policy of land expropriation without compensation. It further addresses concerns with a lack of farming knowledge and the impact this will have on expropriated farms.

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Twenty-One Years for Mass Murder: What the World Can Learn from Norway’s Short Sentencing Laws

Twenty-One Years for Mass Murder: What the World Can Learn from Norway’s Short Sentencing Laws

After Anders Behrin Breivik went on a killing spree that left nearly 80 people dead, Norway gave him its maximum criminal sentence: twenty-one years. While it seems surprising, Norway’s policy of short-term sentences and preventative detention could be a feasible solution to problems with mass incarceration around the world. 

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Do Terminally Ill Patients have a Right to Die Under Article 3 of European Convention on Human Rights?

Do Terminally Ill Patients have a Right to Die Under Article 3 of European Convention on Human Rights?

Spanish Congress is considering a new bill that would legalize assisted suicide for terminally ill patients. If the bill does not pass, do those patients have a right to die using assisted suicide under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Given the breadth and subjective nature of how degrading treatment is determined by the Court, patients could have a viable argument.

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Armenia’s Velvet Revolution and What It Means for Its Legal System

Armenia’s Velvet Revolution and What It Means for Its Legal System

Armenian citizens protested for several days demanding a change to Armenia’s corrupt political and social culture. The people’s revolt resulted in the Prime Minister stepping down and the people’s choice candidate stepping in. The crowds of protesters celebrated their victory and success. But what does this mean for the country’s legal system as it moves toward a more free and democratic nation? 

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Will Lebanon Be Saying “Same System, New Law” Post-Election Day in May?

Will Lebanon Be Saying “Same System, New Law” Post-Election Day in May?

By Marlene Zieah

As Lebanon votes for parliamentary members for the first time in nearly ten years, will it be able to maintain its sectarian-based governmental system? Proponents and opponents of the new electoral law have differing views on the effects it will have on equal representation in government and stabilizing the region.

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Uruguay’s Cannabis Reform Sparks Re-evaluation of International Drug Regulations

Uruguay’s Cannabis Reform Sparks Re-evaluation of International Drug Regulations

By Sydney Wright

Uruguay is the first country to legalize recreational cannabis. However, this revolutionary legislation puts the country in breach with 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. An upcoming review of certain cannabis-related drugs by the World Health Organization could potentially modernize the international law as recreational cannabis becomes more accepted in the Americas.

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