Censorship in China: The Government Wants the Best of Both Worlds

Censorship in China: The Government Wants the Best of Both Worlds

By: Sarah Payne Faris.

Famous for its Internet censorship, the government touts it’s respect for constitutional provisions of speech.  Although the government appears to perceive the Internet as a fount of wisdom, it attempts to shield citizens from using it to its full potential.  The nation’s recent crackdown on social media site Weibo appears to illustrate what appears to be contradictory, but is supported by the country’s Constitution. 

Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Hu%C3%A1ngx%C4%ABng_L%C3%B9_Commercial_Pedestrian_Street_in_Changsha.jpg

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China's Forced Repatriation of North Korean Defectors

China's Forced Repatriation of North Korean Defectors

By: Abbie Carver.

The human rights concerns surrounding the DPRK are abundant. Tens of thousands of North Korean civilians have been abducted by the North Korean government; family members of “dissidents” have disappeared; North Koreans sent to prison camps experience torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment (many fall ill or die soon after entering custody); citizens must obtain permission to travel within the country as well as abroad; women are trafficked and forced into marriages; and millions of North Koreans face extreme hunger or starvation.

 

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Trademark Triumph in China?

Trademark Triumph in China?

By Tyler Seling.

Until recently, many U.S. companies faced trademark issues in China. China uses a "first to file" trademark system, which is in stark contrast to the U.S.'s "first to use" system. This has impacted large corporations such as Pfizer and Apple. Today's post discusses a recent decision by the Chinese Supreme Court that ruled in favor of Michael Jordan and ordered a Chinese company to stop using its trademark.

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China’s Increased Regulations for Online Payment Platforms

China’s Increased Regulations for Online Payment Platforms

By: Janice Pan

On December 28, 2015, the People’s Bank of China issued its rules regarding online payments in China. Industry players criticized  these rules as being the “harshest rules in history,” specifically targeting third-party payment industries and non-bank payment organizations. So what did China finally decide to do?

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