Lukashenko’s Monopoly: Media Freedoms In The “Last Dictatorship In Europe” In The Internet Age

Lukashenko’s Monopoly: Media Freedoms In The “Last Dictatorship In Europe” In The Internet Age

By: Michael T. Moran.

Since 1994, the Belarusian government—headed by President Alexander Lukashenko—has systematically repressed viable political opposition. Lukashenko has consolidated political power by curbing media freedoms and the dissemination of information deemed detrimental to the regime. However, the inception of the Internet has provided alternative channels of information collection, which in turn has emboldened Belarusian citizens to question and confront the status quo. In early 2017, however, planned peaceful protests throughout Belarusian urban centers opposing the Lukashenko regime were met with violent backlash from police forces.

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Catalan Independence and the Human Right of Self-Determination

Catalan Independence and the Human Right of Self-Determination

By: Mikka Burrell.

Catalonia is a part of Spain geographically larger than some EU countries. However, the 7.5 million inhabitants of Catalonia neither speak Spanish nor consider themselves Spaniards. Does international law provide a foundation for the ongoing claims for Catalonian independence?

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European Hate Speech Laws and their Chilling Effects on the Freedom of Expression

European Hate Speech Laws and their Chilling Effects on the Freedom of Expression

By Kelly Kane.

American's enjoy a constitutional right to freedom of speech. However, this right is not unviersal. Certian European countries place limits on freedom of speech. Today's blog post discusses the European laws regarding freedom of speech and hate speech.

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Why Do U.S. Police Officers Use More Excessive Force Against Civilians Than Many European Countries and What Can Be Done?

Why Do U.S. Police Officers Use More Excessive Force Against Civilians Than Many European Countries and What Can Be Done?

By Abbie Carver.

In 2015, U.S. police officers killed a reported 1,152 people. This is 18 times more lethal than police officers in Denmark, and 100 times more lethal that police officers in Finland. Today's post discusses why there might be such a difference between U.S. and European police forces.

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