Dual Citizenship Controversies in Japan

Dual Citizenship Controversies in Japan

By: Kellina Heylek.

Over sixty countries ban or restrict dual citizenship, based on common law principles regarding allegiances to one’s nationality at birth. However, citizenship can be based both on the location of one’s birth as well as one’s parents’ nationality. Do these principles make sense in the new global economy?

Image credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Renho.JPG

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How 18 Years of Precedent Can Disappear in an Instant: Understanding Brazil’s Recent Decision Allowing Advertisement of Sexual Orientation Conversion Therapy

How 18 Years of Precedent Can Disappear in an Instant: Understanding Brazil’s Recent Decision Allowing Advertisement of Sexual Orientation Conversion Therapy

By: Kellina Yzette Heylek.

The Federal Council of Psychology in Brazilian ruled over 18 years ago that psychiatrists cannot advertise sexual orientation reversion therapies to potential patients as a cure for homosexuality. Many professional medical associations have made statements discrediting these conversion therapies stating it is ineffective and harmful. However, in September 2017, a federal judge in Brazil has overruled this precedent and has allowed psychiatrists to again advertise these treatments.

Image credit: © 2006 Reuters. A man shows his rainbow flag during the Gay Pride parade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 30, 2006. https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/styles/1200w1200h/public/multimedia_images_2017/201709americas_brazil_lgbt.jpg?itok=7kN5oDSa

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Is There Any Other Way?: Understanding Refugees’ Right to Property after Denmark’s Passage of the Jewelry Law

Is There Any Other Way?: Understanding Refugees’ Right to Property after Denmark’s Passage of the Jewelry Law

By: Kellina Keylek.

In 2015 alone, one million people from the Middle East and parts of Africa reached the European Union seeking asylum from countries consumed by war, political instability, and repression. Placed between two of the most “immigrant friendly” countries in Europe, Denmark responded to the influx of asylum seekers by enacting new policies further restricting the rights of refugees.

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