Twenty-One Years for Mass Murder: What the World Can Learn from Norway’s Short Sentencing Laws

Twenty-One Years for Mass Murder: What the World Can Learn from Norway’s Short Sentencing Laws

After Anders Behrin Breivik went on a killing spree that left nearly 80 people dead, Norway gave him its maximum criminal sentence: twenty-one years. While it seems surprising, Norway’s policy of short-term sentences and preventative detention could be a feasible solution to problems with mass incarceration around the world. 

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Norway's policies on media ownership and transparency, and media pluralism make it "faultless" for press freedom

By: Alexandra Arkin.

The Norwegian constitution and Norwegian law prioritize media pluralism and media ownership transparency by targeting concentration of media ownership and supporting public media.  In contrast, the U.S. seems to be reversing policies that limit the concentration of media ownership, and the Trump administration wants to cut federal funding for public broadcasting by almost 94%.

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Legal Ramifications of Norway’s Government-Abducted Children

Legal Ramifications of Norway’s Government-Abducted Children

By: Brad Bourne.

Simply put, Norway is generally considered to be one of the best countries to call “home.” Despite a well-founded reputation, Norway is not flawless or free of controversy. From 2008 to 2013, there was a fifty percent increase in the overall number of children removed from their homes in Norway. Together, these cases, and the public’s response to them, serve as the basis for the assertion that the Norwegian government is engaged in the practice of “child-kidnapping."

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